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Editorial | Ban on single-use plastics shaping up

We have been following community stories on how single-use plastic clog our ditches and end as one of the most fatal cause of death at the Davao Gulf, killing marine creatures steadily through the years. There is a growing clamor for the ban on single-use plastic across the world after its ill-effect on the environment surfaced and reared its ugly head.

The use of plastic bags that people use in supermarkets only started in the 70’s yet its impact on the environment is so devastating that it can be found everywhere, even in the ocean floor in the form of microplastics.

Rich countries face the same difficulties in disposing garbage as the developing countries, so some of them resort to shipping off their tons of trash to poorer countries like the Philippines.

But there are local and national initiatives to mitigate the use of plastic through corporate or crafting laws to regulate plastic use. This week, a committee hearing on the proposed Single-Use Plastics Regulation Ordinance of 2020 was conducted by the committee on environment headed by Councilor Diosdado Mahipus Jr, who is the author of the ordinance. Among the items deliberated was the use of plastic packaging of egg trays. In many cities, poultry owners are reverting to pulp trays for packing, storing and transporting the eggs as these protect the food items better and are more environment-friendly as it is degradable.

The proposed ordinance will ban single-use plastics such as cups, condiment containers, lids, stirrers, cutleries, straws, pastry packaging, hand gloves, “buntings,” balloon sticks and egg trays. Distributors or sellers are given two months to manage their inventory. If the ordinance is passed, we will be joining the growing number of cities in the forefront of securing a better environment for the next generation.

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